Gay Marriage and 900,000 Abortions

© Deafilosophy / Chris Hanna

There has been a story of unadulterated, bigoted, piffle recirculating the interwebs this week discussing the supposed massive influx of abortions that would result from the legalization of gay marriage.  While laughable and astoundingly picturesque of the state of confirmation bias within many conservative religious sects, this sparked an age old comment in my mind, one that I thought would be an enlightening statistical analysis to the perfection of a perfect God’s perfect creation.

 

While the logical paradox that is a “gay marriage abortion” may make you cringe with astonishment I feel it should be plainly elaborated here.  There is absolutely no way that two gay people can reproduce using any natural or state of the art scientific methods without the introduction of the biological material from an outside third party.  With this stated, there is simply no possible way for gay marriage legalization to result in even one more abortion than what would happen under the current legal parameters outlined in the United States judicial system.

 

The only area where this non correlation can be conceived, heh, is in a slippery slope of morality where gay marriage opens a gate of immorality devouring our nation and ultimately the world.  Funny thing is, this is a similar argument to what was used to prevent the slaves from gaining their freedom, women from voting,  African Americans from voting, and all the progress of the civil rights movements.  Its getting repetitive is it not?
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Freedom to Discriminate

© Jordan Francis Patrick Smith

Freedom of/from religion was a beautiful idea, supposed to rid the world of idiotic shamanism and inspire scepticism, or at best a move towards deism.

 

Sadly, the beauty of an idea is only as great as its safeguards. None of which were put in place; therefore freedom of religion or non-religion led to privatised preaching. The uneducated were sold lies by richer charlatans who not only had freedom to say whatever bigoted or outdated thing they professed to believe, but had tax incentives to boot. The hole left by deregulation was filled by the very thing the country stood against. Now the U.S. is arguably one of the most religious countries in the world. Regarding deregulation you only need to look at the banking crisis of recent years; the free reign of children for priests in the church; the misuse of billions by right-wing Christians in the U.S. taken from pious believers ; All of this possible when regulatory powers are taken away from higher bodies.

 

This recent misuse of freedom has resulted in anti-gay laws in the U.S. Obviously nothing new, the U.S. has always had some sort of anti-homosexual tendencies, from the ‘don’t ask don’t tell’ armed forces attitude, to the mental disorder diagnosed to gays in the U.S. until 1974; truly disgusting.

 

These laws are different; in Indiana (and other states that have began to follow suit) companies are placing signs in their front windows proclaiming ‘No admission to Gays’, ‘No Gays allowed’, or my favourite of the bunch – a rainbow symbolising the LGBT community with a red X through it. (who puts an X through a rainbow? I mean really?)
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Fundamentally Fundamental about the Fundamentals of Fundies: Facepalms of Biblical Proportions

Despite loose usage of the term and the tossing about of its diminutive form, “fundamentalist” is not a pejorative: the word was invented by conservative Christians for purposes of self-identification and bears an exact meaning that has only secondarily to do with attitude. I’m well acquainted with the history of this word because it is my interesting fortune to have been raised in one of the small, fractious, separatist, backwater Christian sects that coined it around the turn of the 20th century.

 

By the time I was born at mid-century, Missionary Baptist churches all over the U.S. South proudly touted their fundamentalist bona fides on the signs that identified them: “Independent – Bible-believing – Fundamental.” While dismissing the historic creeds as the inventions of fallen man, such churches showed not the least hesitation in publishing “statements of faith” (as though “creed” meant something different) sometimes disguised as “church covenants,” and those published statements always included an article such as “We believe the Bible to be the divinely-inspired and wholly inerrant Word of God.” Fundamentalists of the other monotheistic religions hold a similar attitude regarding their various “holy books.” Belief in the divine origin of a “sacred scripture” is essential to fundamentalists of all sects, because it’s the primary premise – often unspoken – in all of their arguments.

 

What I wish I could say to fundamentalists of all stripes (and wish they could hear me when I say it) is that their foundational premise is false. The Bible is most certainly not the Word of God: it has no more to do with the (alleged) creator of the universe than the Qur’an, the Book of Mormon or the Left Behind series.
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Personal Journey Series: My Atheist Testimony

I get a lot of messages, most of which are asking about my deconversion from christianity. People want to know why I left, what it meant to me when I was a christian, and why I don’t see any reason to return. For anyone who has asked, and anyone else who is curious, here is my testimony.

 

I started life as an atheist. My parents, who were both raised as catholics, never felt the need to force religion or god upon me. I have never seen my mother or father as being faithful. As an adult I have come to know my dad is an atheist and my mother is (basically) a pantheist. My mum and dad were both followers of a man called Prem Rawat (Maharaji), an Indian guru with millions of followers world-wide who preaches peace and love. Many consider him to be a new messiah (he does not claim this himself). My parents often encouraged me to embrace the messages / teachings of Maharaji throughout my childhood and teenage years, but I never connected.

 

What I did connect with, though, was christianity. At age 6 my mum enrolled me into two christian institutions; the nearby lutheran church Sunday school and the local Girls Brigade company (pic below). Her only motivation for doing this was free childcare. She and my dad had divorced when I was 5 and my mum was working full time – the church offered what was ultimately cheap babysitting. For me though, it would start me on a path that would consume my existence for the next 15 years.
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