Cellar Door Skeptics 168: Inspection Metal Ramble Cast with a Board Game Cherry on Top 

This weeks episode Tanner and Hanna freestyle the show as they catch up on their lives. They talk about their love of music, past musical concerts, and what they feel should come back for them to see and enjoy, They talk through Tanner’s daughters obsession with Kirby along with a new restaurant in Japan. As the episode continues they talk about their dream vacations along with some recent documentaries they havewatched. The show ends talking about board games and Tanner’s obsession with them.

Enjoy their random ramble cast as they relax and unload this week.

Subscribe: http://www.spreaker.com/user/cellardoorskeptics
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CellarDoorSkeptics
RSS Feed: https://www.spreaker.com/user/8326690/episodes/feed
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cellar-door-skeptics/id1044088575?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4
Website: http://cellardoorskeptics.com
Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/cellar-door-skeptics
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cellardoorskeptics
PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/CellarDoorSkeptics
Intro Music: http://aloststateofmind.com

Links
——–
http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2019/01/japans_kirby_cafe_is_being_updated_with_adorable_new_merch_and_menu_items
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirby_(series)
https://skinnylister.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrs._McGrath
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Inch_Nails_discography
https://thearmed.bandcamp.com/
https://sectioned.bandcamp.com/album/annihilated
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varg_Vikernes
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Until_the_Light_Takes_Us
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What_We_Do_in_the_Shadows
https://www.netflix.com/title/70140450
https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/83330/mansions-madness
https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/150376/dead-winter-crossroads-game

Cellar Door Skeptics 134: Type O Negative Saves the World

The ramblefest which is this weeks podcast, takes Hanna and Tanner, the Chris Squared Dynamic Duo, spends an hour and a half catching up, relaying amazing stories, and giving you a behind the scenes look at their relationship, friendship, and love of the human race.

There is not much more to the conversation other than take off your socks, kick your feet up, and relax with Cellar Door Skeptics late night show.

Subscribe: http://www.spreaker.com/user/cellardoorskeptics
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CellarDoorSkeptics
RSS Feed: https://www.spreaker.com/user/8326690/episodes/feed
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cellar-door-skeptics/id1044088575?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4
Website: http://cellardoorskeptics.com
Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/cellar-door-skeptics
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cellardoorskeptics
PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/CellarDoorSkeptics
Intro Music: http://aloststateofmind.com/

Links
——
http://loudwire.com/limp-bizkit-fred-durst-mockumentary-short-film-the-truth/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JGsRHvwhvQ
https://noisey.vice.com/en_us/article/ryjnv6/fred-durst-the-interview

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjoe
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/ppm45m/marjoe-director-sarah-kernochan-talks-about-her-incredible-doc-on-the-evangelical-conman-456

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/10/philip-k-dicks-electric-dreams-trailer-amazons-bryan-cranston-1201884471/
https://www.amazon.com/Philip-K-Dicks-Electric-Dreams/dp/B075NTXMN9

About that God-Shaped Hole

This piece is a contribution from our good friend David Goza who can also be watched here.

Throughout most of my life, I’ve regularly heard one version or another of a shopworn claim made by pulpiteers, Sunday school teachers, Christian bloggers and authors, participants in Christian Facebook groups, and so forth. It goes like this: There’s a “God-shaped hole” inside each of us, and unless we fill it with God we’ll never be happy. Since nature abhors a vacuum, we’ll try to fill that void with something (a list usually follows, and will typically include sex, drugs and rock-‘n’-roll). But nothing we try to fill it with will ever really satisfy us since only God can fill it perfectly.

 

One encounters many variations on this theme, including the often-heard claim that atheists make a religion of evolution or a god of Richard Dawkins (or of themselves) and that those who do not embrace the Kingdom of Heaven will almost certainly become political activists of the communist variety, bent on establishing their own substitute heavenly kingdom on Earth.

 

That claim is a gross distortion of a metaphor coined by Jean Paul Sartre, who spent much of his career teasing apart the particulars of our uneasy relationship with the culture in which we find ourselves embroiled without having chosen it. His “God-shaped hole” metaphor points at the essential emptiness at the heart of our industrial civilization, with its pointless routines, infuriating distractions and glut of cheap, toxic crap. It’s a poignant metaphor meant to capture the poignancy of our predicament.

 

The misuse I cited earlier represents a warping almost beyond recognition by those who employ Sartre’s metaphor casually without having read what he had to say about it. I want to try to couch it in terms that make better sense, that are truer to Sartre’s meaning.

 

It’s obvious that most humans feel a deep need for meaning in their lives, and thus pursue it in various ways. Many – surely most to at least some degree – seek meaning outside themselves, in something “larger” (the family, the community, the state, the church, the cosmos), but this isn’t true of everyone. A few seem to locate meaning only in themselves, and this leads to some distressingly predictable behaviors. Those so described almost inevitably end up at the top of whatever ladder it is they’re climbing and thus join the ranks of the most dangerous people alive: the narcissists and sociopaths who wield great power and command vast wealth. Like black holes, they take but do not give. In their case, it may be that “meaning” is the wrong word: perhaps “fulfillment” would be a better choice.
Continue reading “About that God-Shaped Hole”

What Art Might Tell Us, If Only We’d Listen

Each semester, I begin my World Music classes with a brief, general orientation that includes basic concepts and strategies for understanding the unfamiliar-sounding music my students are going to be hearing for the ensuing four months. One of the things I introduce right away is a taxonomic scheme for thinking critically about any artwork in any of the arts (the arts being our most-nearly infallible guide to the worldviews of all cultures – including, of course, our own). For music, the most important categories within that scheme are formalism, expressionism, and instrumentality. Other critiques are of course possible: much art invites and yields very well to a realistic critique for instance, or a feminist critique, or a Marxist one, etc. But for purposes of most of the music one is likely to hear, my proffered three-item taxonomy is sufficient to make headway.
Continue reading “What Art Might Tell Us, If Only We’d Listen”

If God Falls Like a Tree In the Forest and No One Hears, Does God Exist?

At the beginning of every semester, I tell my students: there is a world of difference between hearing music and listening to it.  Emphatically despite the fact that “hear” and “listen” are often used interchangeably in casual speech, as though they were exact synonyms. In fact, they mean two completely different – although not entirely unrelated – things.

 

I’ve spent a goodly portion of my life thinking about language and trying to understand its expressive range, the better to express myself. I’ve noticed that transitive verbs do not carry the same weight – are not charged with the same energy – as intransitive verbs. Did any of your English teachers ever tell you that? Mine didn’t: I had to discover it for myself.

 

Let me illustrate: We regularly hear music, but we also occasionally listen to music. The transitive verb requires a direct object to complete its meaning; the intransitive verb is complete in itself (hence its greater potency), and the prepositional phrase that follows adds no weight to the verb: it simply brings the verb’s activity to a focus.

 

school-class-401519_640

The difference in energy between transitive and intransitive verbs is faithfully reflected in our daily experience. Taking the illustrative case I’ve offered above, consider the fact that hearing is an altogether passive experience which might actually be described as a condition, often ignored and therefore mostly registered unconsciously; every animal with ears has pretty much the same experience of hearing, assuming similar auditory capacities. (There are interesting differences, of course: dogs can hear at least an octave higher than humans, and humpback whales and elephants can communicate in wavelengths much longer than those available to us.) The capacity – the sense – known as hearing is our ability to register physical phenomena in a way that’s available only to an exquisitely fine-tuned nervous system, by means of equipment (eardrums, etc.) that can respond to (resonate with) disturbances in some fluid medium such as air or water. The old conundrum, “if a tree falls in a completely unpopulated forest, does it make a sound?” is thus answered: sound is the name we give to that nervous-system registering, that experience of a disturbance in air or water. Where there is no experience, i.e. no experiencer, there is no sound.
Continue reading “If God Falls Like a Tree In the Forest and No One Hears, Does God Exist?”

On Barricades and the Stifling of Divergent Opinion

I’m going to use some ugly words in this essay. It makes me squirm whenever I have to do that, but in this case it’s necessary in order to make my point.

 

During the formative years of my life I spent every Sunday morning, Sunday evening and Wednesday evening at the Missionary Baptist Church in which my parents (well, mostly my mother) raised me. I got to know that church’s teachings very well: I was one of those kids who took everything very seriously and listened carefully to what the authority figures – chief among whom was the pastor of said church – had to say. I was then (as now) a very impressionable, vulnerable person. This trait is sometimes described as “hypersensitivity.” It’s the reason that I became a musician. It is also the reason that I have taken “spiritual” things so seriously throughout my life: there’s no doubt in my mind that I’ve read the Bible much more closely than most Christians, and I’ve scrutinized the holy books of some other cultures almost as thoroughly. More importantly, I have reflected deeply on that reading: have tried to download it into my very cells. I’ve been open to it all, and believed it all. I need to enlarge a little on that in order to make my meaning clear.
Continue reading “On Barricades and the Stifling of Divergent Opinion”